The 12th of November was the battle of Brentford, surprisingly fought; and to the great consternation of the City, had his Majesty (as it was believed he would) pursued his advantage. I came in with my horse and arms just at the retreat1; but was not permitted to stay longer than the 15th, by reason of the army marching to Gloucester; which would have left both me and my brothers exposed to ruin, without any advantage to his Majesty2


  1. Charles had taken Brentford on the 12th; but being-faced next day by Essex at Turnham Green, he retreated through Reading to Oxford, which he reached 29th November –AH 

  2. The introduction to Bray gives the following background: [Evelyn] set out,  intent to join King Charles I. at Brentford; and subsequently desisting when the result of that battle became known, on the ground that his brother’s as well as his own estates were so near London as to be fully in power of the Parliament, and that their continued adherence would have been certain ruin to themselves without any advantage to his Majesty. In this dangerous conjuncture he asked and obtained the King’s leave to travel..